Choices in Little Rock: An Approach to Teaching the Civil Rights Movement

Students at Central High in Little Rock, Arkansas

buy Pregabalin usa Next Workshop: October 26, 2017, from 9AM to 4PM
http://sanctuairebd.com/24153-dtf69880-site-rencontre-gratuit-oise.html Workshop Location: Michael Klahr Center, University of Maine at Augusta
jetez un oeil sur le site ici Facilitators: Liz Helitzer and Dan Pearl
Contact Hours Earned: 6
Workshop Cost: $75
Meals provided
Note: A limited number of stipends are available for those traveling 80 miles or more from the HHRC

Click here to Register today!

Choices in Little Rock: An Approach to Teaching the Civil Rights Movement is a one-day professional development teacher workshop sponsored by Facing History and Ourselves.

In 1957, nine black teenagers faced the threats of angry mobs when they attempted to enter Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. The desegregation of Central High School ignited a crisis historian Taylor Branch describes as “the most severe test of the Constitution since the Civil War.” In this workshop, we will examine this key moment in U.S. history and learn new ways to engage students in the issues raised by the American civil rights movement and their implications today.

In this workshop participants will:
  • Discover new interdisciplinary teaching strategies that reinforce historical and literacy skills
  • Receive a free copy of Choices in Little Rock

After this workshop participants will:

  • Become part of the Facing History educator network, with access to a rich slate of educator resources, including downloadable unit and lesson plans, study guides, and multimedia
  • Be able to borrow books and DVDs through our online lending library at no cos

For more information, contact the HHRC at (207)621-3530 or jacob.albert@maine.edu.

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