Press Herald: Voices and faces of domestic violence on display in Augusta

McLean, the Camden photographer whose ex-husband, the singer Don McLean, was convicted on charges related to domestic abuse, is giving voice to her story and the stories of more than a dozen other women who have extricated themselves from abusive situations. The multimedia exhibition, “Finding Our Voices: Breaking the Silence of Domestic Abuse,” is on view at the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine in Augusta through Dec. 13.

The exhibition includes McLean’s portraits of the women, audio recordings of them speaking about their abuse and quotes from each about their situation. Shenna Bellows, the center’s executive director, said she wanted the center to host this exhibition because domestic violence is a human rights issue. “So often we think of domestic violence as a private matter. The human rights framework provides an opportunity to challenge that perception and pose it as a societal problem that all of us can address,” Bellows said. “One of our missions is to to give voice to people who have experienced human rights abuses and to work with survivors to tell their stories to lead us to solutions.”

Read the rest on the Press Herald website.

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