How I Brought Peace to the Middle East

The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine welcomes

David Kaye’s

D-Kaye-2015

Kaye tells the story of moving his small family to Israel for six months in 2012 to teach on a Fulbright Scholarship. A self-proclaimed “naive Jew from Vermont,” Kaye had high hopes of settling the turmoil overseas once and for all. This funny and touching one-man show will take the audience along on Kaye’s many misadventures from New England to the Holy Land.

How I Brought Peace to the Middle East won a Spotlight on the Arts Award for best new play and Kaye performed the piece as an official selection at the prestigious United Solo Festival in New York City.

Kaye currently serves as chair of the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of New Hampshire. He has worked throughout the U.S. as a professional actor, director, and designer for such companies as the Texas Shakespeare Festival, the Theater at Monmouth in Maine, the National Theatre of the Performing Arts in NYC, Boston Chamber Theatre, and Stages Repertory Theatre in Houston, TX.

 How I Brought Peace to the Middle East is presented by the HHRC in conjunction with its newest exhibit Yearning to Breathe Free: The Immigrant Experience in Maine open now through April 1 at the Michael Klahr Center.

Performing at the Michael Klahr Center, 46 University Drive, Augusta, ME

Tuesday, March 15th and Wednesday, March 16th at 7 p.m.

Adults $15, Students and Seniors $10, Current UMA students (with ID) Free Admission

To reserve or purchase tickets call 621-3530 or visit Brown Paper Tickets.

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