America Now…A Dialogue

October 20th – December 20th
Special Event: Friday, October 20th, 5:30 p.m.

Visit the exhibition website here:
http://americanowexhibit.com

The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine is proud to host a new exhibit, America Now…A Dialogue, curated by Bruce Brown, curator emeritus of the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in Rockland.

‘America Now’  runs at the Michael Klahr Center from October 20th through December 20th, 2017 and features recent work by 28 Maine visual artists.

The exhibit opened Friday, October 20th. A program scheduled for 5:30 featured several of the artists. Watch a video of the opening here:

(America Now Opening from HHRC Maine on Vimeo)

‘America Now: A Dialogue…’ features work by Judith Allen-Efstathiou, Joanne Arnold, Brendan Bullock, Nancy Davison, Kenneth Eason, Nick Gervin, Judy Glickman-Lauder,  Derek Jackson, Alan Magee, George Mason, Natasha Mayers, Ed McCartan, Leonard Meiselman, Jack Montgomery, Hans Nielsen, Mathew O’Donnell, Claire Seidl, Abigail Shahn, Robert Shetterly, Gail Skudera, Susan Smith,  Roland Salazar Rose, Dave Wade,  Mary Becker Weiss, Deanna M. Witman, and Edward Zelinsky.

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