Dr. King on Riots and Protest

“Anyone who does anything to help a child in [their] life is a hero to me.” (2)

vivastreet rencontre haute normandie I think America must see that riots do not develop out of thin air. Certain conditions continue to exist in our society which must be condemned as vigorously as we condemn riots. But in the final analysis, a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it that America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the Negro poor has worsened over the last few years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice, equality, and humanity. 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
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